Connect: The New Way to Click & Pledge

Click & Pledge, the online donation tool for nonprofits that integrates with Salesforce, has really upped its game with a new platform called Connect. What Click & Pledge Does Well The functionality of Click & Pledge, both on the payment processing and on the Salesforce integration end, has always been superior. The money goes straight to your bank and the contact data goes right into your Salesforce— keeping everyone happy. Particularly helpful is the sophisticated logic Click & Pledge employs to prevent duplicates. For example, when Paul Baxter gives $100 to your organization every Christmas for five years, the logic recognizes that the single contact Paul Baxter gave a total of $500, rather than five separate Paul Baxter’s donating $100 each. What Click & Pledge Used to Do Less Well Click & Pledge generates its own payment forms and receipts, and the problem was that the documents it produced looked like relics from the 1990’s. The concern wasn’t only that documents were unattractive; many clients were concerned that the payment form looked so different from the surrounding website that people would hesitate to enter their credit card information. Pictured below: The old Click & Pledge payment form Now Click & Pledge offers attractive, editable forms that satisfy the needs of even the most discerning Development Director. Pictured below: The new Click & Pledge payment form template No More Portal If you’ve been using Click & Pledge for a while, you’ll be familiar with the Portal. Previously, one of the problems with Click & Pledge was that some of its functions were configured inside Salesforce, whereas other remained outside in...

Pitfalls and Best Practices: How to Keep Your Salesforce Project From Being Doomed

Participants from our popular Salesforce Bootcamp for Nonprofits trainings will be familiar with an exercise we run called “Pitfalls and Best Practices.” In this exercise, we hand out sheets of paper to every participant, each piece with a different scenario on it. The students then must interpret the situation and use an anecdote to illustrate why it is or isn’t a good thing. We will often pass on particularly noteworthy stories at other Bootcamps, with names redacted of course! A selection of these “Pitfalls and Best Practices” are offered below. So, you can either give yourself a well-deserved pat on the back, or shudder at the mistakes you have made (or maybe just barely avoided). Salesforce is free. Like a free puppy. This quote is from Marc Baizman of the Salesforce Foundation and is aimed specifically at nonprofit users. “Yes, the Foundation makes 10 free licenses available to every organization with a 501c3, but no, that doesn’t mean your troubles are over. Without proper care and training, that cute puppy can make a big mess in no time.” Garbage in, garbage out. Like a kid on Christmas Day, new users can’t wait to open up their Salesforce accounts and use it right away! Don’t let your excitement lead you to make a potentially painful dataset mistake; don’t rush migrating your current data without giving it a long and careful examination. Slowing down will help you avoid putting a lot of duplicative or out-of-date data into your shiny new system. Having an intern or volunteer set up your Salesforce instance. This is another temptation particular to nonprofits. Anything that saves...

Click & Pledge Update: Is Your Domain Secure?

Click & Pledge, the online donation portal, has recently notified its users of a domain security update. Our clients asked us to advise them on how to respond to this. Fortunately, the solution is relatively straightforward. Like Salesforce, Click and Pledge is aware that it is passing on extremely confidential information like credit card numbers, names, and emails. Their email is a demonstration of their commitment to following the latest protocols in ensuring that the information remains confidential. This is what the email notification looks like: Click and Pledge provides tools so that you can post a donation form on your website. The issue is whether the donation form is hosted locally (i.e. by you) or remotely (generally by Click and Pledge themselves). Either way you can easily confirm whether the donation form is secure. Here are four easy steps to follow: Go to your website Click “Donate Now” or the equivalent Look at the command line on your browser. If it begins, “https:” you are secure. If it only begins “http:” you should follow the instructions in the email in consultation with your web developer.  ...

Using Excel for Nonprofit Data Migration

Thomas Edison famously said that “Genius is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration.”  If he’d been a Salesforce user, he would have said, “Data upload is 99% preparation and 1% migration.” Data migration is the task of transferring large amounts of data into Salesforce from another platform. To accomplish this you will typically use Microsoft Excel or another spreadsheet program that allows you to create “common-separated value” or CSV files.  In this blog we will review some of the commonly used tools that are built into Excel to make it easier to prepare your data BEFORE you mass-migrate it into Salesforce, ensuring that the data you migrate is as accurate as possible.  After all, you don’t need to be a genius to know the expression, “Garbage in, garbage out”! NAMES MUST BE STORED IN SEPARATE CELLS Some database products expect you to put a person’s full name into a single cell.  Salesforce, however, requires that the First Name and Last Name be separated.   BEFORE: Name Buzzina Lightyear Destiny Husband Adam Levine Kelly Preston   Before you start trying to copy and paste each last name separately into a new cell, try this: Excel Tip: Text-to-Columns Use Data | Text to Columns to separate data into two columns:   Create an empty column to the right of the Name column (Select | Insert Columns) Select the Name column Click Data | Text to Columns Click “Delimited” For Delimiter Select “Space” (Tab is default) Click Next and Finish If you get an error message that Data is Already There Click OK Rename fields as “First Name” and “Last Name” AFTER: First...